Experts in rehabilitation, HTS is committed to introducing new clinical programs and best practices that improve patient care delivery and outcomes. With falls being the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for people 65 years of age and older, HTS has revitalized our Falls Prevention Program with evidence-based assessments, interventions, and resources. This new program, STEADY, provides the most advanced therapeutic interventions and treatment practices to adhere to the HTS commitment of perfecting rehabilitation.

Now introducing… STEADY:  A Comprehensive Therapy Approach to Fall Prevention.  STEADY is a therapy-driven fall prevention program designed to be utilized by Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy.  The overall purpose of this program is to reduce the prevalence and risk of falls while improving the quality of life for our patients.

The HTS STEADY Program includes tools and resources on fall risk factors, evidence-based assessments and interventions, and educational handouts for patients and caregivers. The STEADY program provides a program protocol, fall prevention analysis tool and a falls tracking log to drive program efficacy.

This program will address many of the factors that lead to falls, such as:

  • Physical Inactivity
  • Fear of Falls
  • Low Vision
  • Balance & Mobility
  • Polypharmacy
  • Foot and Ankle Health
  • Cognitive Function
  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Sleep Health
  • Pain
  • Vestibular Dysfunction
  • Environmental Modifications

Patient and caregiver education is a vital component of this program.  For patients, STEADY provides essential health literacy tools to use at home such as: exercise handouts, home safety checklists, daily pain diary and more.  For caregivers, education is focused on environmental modifications, safe patient transfers, wheelchair and bed positioning safety, and instructions for getting up from a fall.

For more information about the HTS STEADY Program, please contact your HTS Regional Director.

Need a Powerful Therapy Partner? Contact Amanda Green, Executive Director of Strategic Development amanda@htstherapy.com for information about our contract therapy partnerships.

Blog by Sherry Roberts, RN, Clinical Consultant, Proactive Medical Review

COVID-19 is an acute, sometimes severe, respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus SARS-CoV2. Person-to-person spread occurs through contact with infected secretions, mainly via contact with large respiratory droplets, but can also occur via contact with a surface contaminated by respiratory droplets. Nursing facilities face higher risk of transmission due to high population density creating difficulty in maintaining avoidance precautions. Significantly, residents of nursing homes are at high risk for more severe disease because of age and underlying medical disorders.

Clinical Presentation

People with COVID-19 may have few to no symptoms, although some become severely ill and die. Symptoms can include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. The exact incubation time is not certain with estimates ranging from 1 to 14 days. The risk of serious disease and death in COVID-19 cases increases with age. COVID-19 can cause Pneumonia and ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Acute Respiratory Failure and several other conditions.

Respiratory Assessment

If COVID-19 disease is suspected as part of the screening process, a  thorough respiratory assessment is essential, including careful auscultation to identify residents with a risk of significant lower respiratory illness.

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Proper Washing Guide for Homemade/Donated Cloth Masks

  • Before Your First Wear, Wash or Soak in Vinegar to Preserve the Color—Since They will be Washed Often
  • Washing Machine Recommended Versus Handwashing
  • If You Wash Multiple Masks Together, Tie the Strings Beforehand to Prevent Tangling
  • Feel Free to Throw in Regular Wash or Use a Garment Bag
  • Wash on Warm to Hot with Detergent: Click here to see a list of approved detergents to fight the Novel Coronavirus.
  • Dry in a Dryer

As you get older, you may start to have trouble with everyday tasks such as bathing, picking up things off the floor, or even just getting around.  Assistive devices are products and tools that can make life easier. They might be new things you add to your home, or improvements to something you already have.  The first step is recognizing when and where you could use some extra help. Sometimes people adapt to changes in their ability level, giving up things they like to do without even recognizing it.

Here are some ideas that could help make your daily activities easier:

Getting Around:

  • A cane or crutch used on the opposite side of a painful knee or hip makes walking easier and helps the joint last longer.
  • Reachers are long rods with a grip handle on one end and a grabber on the other. They let you pick up small objects without having to bend over or reach uncomfortably.
  • Elevated chair legs make it easier to get in and out of your seat. The chairs you have can usually be fitted with extenders.

In the Kitchen & Bedroom:

  • Rearrange your kitchen so that the things you use most often are the easiest to reach.
  • Use lamps activated by touch or by your voice.
  • Getting dressed could be easier if you switch to big buttons, button hooks, or velcro closures.
  • Find sock aids and zipper pulls. A sock aid can help you pull up your socks without bending your legs. A zipper pull makes zippers easier to grab and zip.

In the Bathroom:

  • A tub bench or shower seat lets you bathe more comfortably and reduces the chance of falls.
  • Grab bars make it easier to get in and out of the bath and on and off the toilet.
  • A raised toilet seat with side rails reduces the strain of getting on and off.
  • Long-handled sponges help you to wash your legs and feet without bending.

 

Occupational Therapists specialize in helping older adults to safely perform activities and do the things they want to do.  Being able to perform basic self-care activities is very important for older adults to safely live independently. They may have other ideas for assistive devices or home modifications that could make a world of difference.  If you are having trouble with completing day-to-day activities, talk with your doctor about physical and occupational therapy to restore your mobility and function as soon as possible.

Southfield Village Therapy Team Celebrates a Successful Recovery!

Patient, Brenda, enjoyed therapy so much that she dressed up for her last day at Southfield Village.

Pictured left to right are Derek Gokee PT, Brenda, and Brian Kemp PTA.

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According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, one in two women and one in four men age 50 and older will suffer an osteoporosis-related fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to weak and brittle bones. Breaking a bone is serious, especially when you’re older and broken bones can cause severe pain.

How Can Therapy Help?

Physical therapy can help manage and prevent osteoporosis as well as reduce falls and injuries for those diagnosed with the disease. Based on a thorough assessment of your posture, balance, strength and flexibility, a physical therapist will work one-on-one with you to target your specific areas of weakness. Also, an occupational therapist will work with you to evaluate your lifestyle, home environment and activities of daily living to ensure you can safely do all the things that you want and need to do. Talk to your doctor about your fall risk and ask if physical or occupational therapy could help. Be sure to have your doctor or pharmacist to review you prescriptions regularly.

Therapy Goals for Preventing & Treating Osteoporosis:

  • Maintain or Increase Bone Mass Density Using Exercise
  • Improve Muscle Strength, Balance, Posture, and Cardiovascular Fitness
  • Improve Psychological Well-being
  • Prevent Fractures
  • Reduce Falls
  • Provide Education

For more information, please contact the therapy department.


References: National Osteoporosis Foundation

The Physical Therapy Team at Heritage Pointe Huntington Celebrates National Physical Therapy Month

We are certainly proud of our awesome Physical Therapy team at Heritage Pointe Huntington. One of the PT therapy students made these shirts for the therapists. How great is that?!

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We had a Great Time at the MCHS Back-to-School Bash

Thanks for including us, Metcalfe Health Care Center, at the Back to School Bash. We are proud to be your partner in therapy!

“Starting the School Year off Strong! We had a great time at the MCHS Back to School Bash last Thursday. Amy Neighbors and our therapy department conducted grip strength testing for both adults and kids and made it a bit of healthy competition. We are proud to provide outpatient therapy services for all ages. Just another way we serve our entire community. Here’s to a great 2019-2020 school year. Go Hornets!”

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We LOVE our friends and partners at Golden Years Homestead!

Set Your Community Apart with Rehab Services
HTS Outpatient Rehabilitation provides your senior living community with convenient, on-site therapy and wellness services to support independence, safety and quality of life for your residents. We provide the very best in programming, equipment and care collaboration to restore your residents to their maximum potential.

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The Bungee Mobility Trainer by Neurogym Tech. available through Medline

“Therapists like this piece of equipment because it allows our rehab guests to work on static and dynamic balance while eliminating the fear of falling. I witnessed a new CABG patient with sternal precautions dancing with one of our therapists using this device. Pretty amazing stuff!

Also, I like the design and smaller footprint of this piece as before our only options for partial weightbearing were to purchase ceiling tracks and harnesses, or large, expensive equipment that fits over treadmills and takes up too much space in the rehab gym. We have heard nothing but good reviews from our therapists on this piece of equipment. It’s becoming the next “must have” in addition to the Biodex Balance Trainer and the ACP Omnicycle which are always popular.”

–  Amanda Green, Executive Director Marketing & Strategic Development

Check it out now!