As you get older, you may start to have trouble with everyday tasks such as bathing, picking up things off the floor, or even just getting around.  Assistive devices are products and tools that can make life easier. They might be new things you add to your home, or improvements to something you already have.  The first step is recognizing when and where you could use some extra help. Sometimes people adapt to changes in their ability level, giving up things they like to do without even recognizing it.

Here are some ideas that could help make your daily activities easier:

Getting Around:

  • A cane or crutch used on the opposite side of a painful knee or hip makes walking easier and helps the joint last longer.
  • Reachers are long rods with a grip handle on one end and a grabber on the other. They let you pick up small objects without having to bend over or reach uncomfortably.
  • Elevated chair legs make it easier to get in and out of your seat. The chairs you have can usually be fitted with extenders.

In the Kitchen & Bedroom:

  • Rearrange your kitchen so that the things you use most often are the easiest to reach.
  • Use lamps activated by touch or by your voice.
  • Getting dressed could be easier if you switch to big buttons, button hooks, or velcro closures.
  • Find sock aids and zipper pulls. A sock aid can help you pull up your socks without bending your legs. A zipper pull makes zippers easier to grab and zip.

In the Bathroom:

  • A tub bench or shower seat lets you bathe more comfortably and reduces the chance of falls.
  • Grab bars make it easier to get in and out of the bath and on and off the toilet.
  • A raised toilet seat with side rails reduces the strain of getting on and off.
  • Long-handled sponges help you to wash your legs and feet without bending.

 

Occupational Therapists specialize in helping older adults to safely perform activities and do the things they want to do.  Being able to perform basic self-care activities is very important for older adults to safely live independently. They may have other ideas for assistive devices or home modifications that could make a world of difference.  If you are having trouble with completing day-to-day activities, talk with your doctor about physical and occupational therapy to restore your mobility and function as soon as possible.

Southfield Village Therapy Team Celebrates a Successful Recovery!

Patient, Brenda, enjoyed therapy so much that she dressed up for her last day at Southfield Village.

Pictured left to right are Derek Gokee PT, Brenda, and Brian Kemp PTA.

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According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, one in two women and one in four men age 50 and older will suffer an osteoporosis-related fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to weak and brittle bones. Breaking a bone is serious, especially when you’re older and broken bones can cause severe pain.

How Can Therapy Help?

Physical therapy can help manage and prevent osteoporosis as well as reduce falls and injuries for those diagnosed with the disease. Based on a thorough assessment of your posture, balance, strength and flexibility, a physical therapist will work one-on-one with you to target your specific areas of weakness. Also, an occupational therapist will work with you to evaluate your lifestyle, home environment and activities of daily living to ensure you can safely do all the things that you want and need to do. Talk to your doctor about your fall risk and ask if physical or occupational therapy could help. Be sure to have your doctor or pharmacist to review you prescriptions regularly.

Therapy Goals for Preventing & Treating Osteoporosis:

  • Maintain or Increase Bone Mass Density Using Exercise
  • Improve Muscle Strength, Balance, Posture, and Cardiovascular Fitness
  • Improve Psychological Well-being
  • Prevent Fractures
  • Reduce Falls
  • Provide Education

For more information, please contact the therapy department.


References: National Osteoporosis Foundation

The Physical Therapy Team at Heritage Pointe Huntington Celebrates National Physical Therapy Month

We are certainly proud of our awesome Physical Therapy team at Heritage Pointe Huntington. One of the PT therapy students made these shirts for the therapists. How great is that?!

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We had a Great Time at the MCHS Back-to-School Bash

Thanks for including us, Metcalfe Health Care Center, at the Back to School Bash. We are proud to be your partner in therapy!

“Starting the School Year off Strong! We had a great time at the MCHS Back to School Bash last Thursday. Amy Neighbors and our therapy department conducted grip strength testing for both adults and kids and made it a bit of healthy competition. We are proud to provide outpatient therapy services for all ages. Just another way we serve our entire community. Here’s to a great 2019-2020 school year. Go Hornets!”

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We LOVE our friends and partners at Golden Years Homestead!

Set Your Community Apart with Rehab Services
HTS Outpatient Rehabilitation provides your senior living community with convenient, on-site therapy and wellness services to support independence, safety and quality of life for your residents. We provide the very best in programming, equipment and care collaboration to restore your residents to their maximum potential.

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The Bungee Mobility Trainer by Neurogym Tech. available through Medline

“Therapists like this piece of equipment because it allows our rehab guests to work on static and dynamic balance while eliminating the fear of falling. I witnessed a new CABG patient with sternal precautions dancing with one of our therapists using this device. Pretty amazing stuff!

Also, I like the design and smaller footprint of this piece as before our only options for partial weightbearing were to purchase ceiling tracks and harnesses, or large, expensive equipment that fits over treadmills and takes up too much space in the rehab gym. We have heard nothing but good reviews from our therapists on this piece of equipment. It’s becoming the next “must have” in addition to the Biodex Balance Trainer and the ACP Omnicycle which are always popular.”

–  Amanda Green, Executive Director Marketing & Strategic Development

Check it out now!

Article By:  PT in Motion, www.apta.org

Patients with low back pain (LBP) who see a single physical therapist (PT) throughout their episode of care may be less likely to receive surgery and may have lower downstream health care costs, researchers suggest in a study published in the December issue of PTJ (Physical Therapy). “Limiting the number of physical therapy providers during an episode of care might permit cost savings,” authors write. “Health care systems could find this opportunity appealing, as physical therapy provider continuity is a modifiable clinical practice pattern.”

Authors examined data from nearly 2,000 patients in Utah’s statewide All Payer Claims Database (APCD) to look for associations between continuity of care for LBP patients and utilization of related services such as advanced imaging, emergency department visits, epidural steroid injections, and lumbar spine surgery in the year after the first primary care visit for LBP. APTA members John Magel, PT, PhD; Anne Thackeray, PT; and Julie Fritz, PT, PhD, FAPTA, were among the authors of the study.

Patients were between the ages of 18 to 64 who saw a PT within 30 days of a primary care visit for LBP. Researchers excluded patients with certain nonmusculoskeletal conditions; neurological conditions, such as spinal cord injury, that could affect patient management; and “red flag” conditions such as bone deficit or cauda equina syndrome.

Researchers found that greater provider continuity significantly decreased the likelihood of receiving subsequent lumbar spine surgery, noting that “disparate management strategies across a variety of providers might inhibit or prolong the recovery in a patient with a worsening condition and contribute to the patient eventually receiving lumbar surgical intervention.” They also note that a strong therapeutic alliance is associated with improved outcomes.

Contrary to authors’ expectations, high provider continuity was not associated with decreased use of advanced imaging, steroid injections, or emergency department visits. “The timing of physical therapy for LBP might have a greater impact on these outcomes than does provider continuity,” they suggest. Researchers did find a link between use of these services and the presence of comorbidities, previous lumbar surgery, and use of prescription opioids or oral steroids.

The average cost of care in the year following the initial primary care visit was $1,826 per patient. Costs were slightly less, at $1,737, for the 90% of patients with high provider continuity but rose to $2,577 for patients with a lower level of provider continuity.

While the study’s findings do not identify any cause-and-effect relationships, “it seems reasonable that physical therapists should consider approaches to managing patients with LBP that limit provider discontinuity,” authors write.

Click here to continue reading this article.

 


 

Speak with your doctor to find out how therapy could benefit you!

HTS is excited to collaborate with our partners for a successful transition to the new Medicare payment model. Our ongoing focus on clinical quality, patient-centered programs, and functional outcomes has prepared our staff in advance to succeed under PDPM. In addition to implementing proprietary clinical program efficacy analysis, HTS has assessed the financial impact of PDPM and is committed to supporting our partners through the challenges of adapting to the new reimbursement model.

HTS will be providing PDPM solutions that include:

  • Staff Education and Training in Critical Areas such as Section GG and ICD.10 Coding
  • PDPM Live Trainings for Partners and Staff in Multiple Locations
  • Internal System Transitions
  • RUGs IV to PDPM Facility-specific Impact Analysis

Our alliance with Proactive Medical Review, the PDPM experts currently providing education on this topic to 25 states, allows us to uniquely provide our partners with additional support for strategic planning, MDS coding efficacy, and nursing best practices.

Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM) training dates:

  • Friday, September 21 – Evansville, IN
  • Thursday, October 4 – Fort Wayne, IN
  • Thursday, October 11 – Louisville, KY
  • Tuesday, October 16 – Greenwood, IN
  • Tuesday, October 23 – Kokomo, IN
  • Friday, November 9 – Edmonton, KY
  • Thursday November 15—Phelps, KY

We remain optimistic considering the enormous changes we are facing with this new payment model. As partners in therapy, you can be confident in our resources and unmatched expertise to navigate this change while working together toward a successful transition.

If you have any questions at all about this information, please contact us directly.

National Physical Therapy Month is a celebration held each October by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). PT month is designed to recognize the impact that physical therapists and physical therapist assistants make in restoring and improving motion in people’s lives. Physical therapists are movement experts who can help you overcome pain, gain and maintain movement, and preserve your independence, often without the need for surgery or long-term use of prescription drugs. Physical therapy is a cost-effective treatment that allows patients to participate in a recovery plan designed for their specific needs.

Goals of physical therapy include:

  • Restore physical function
  • Improve the ability to ambulate
  • Strengthen the body affected by injury/illness
  • Reduce pain and inflammation
  • Education and prevention

We offer comprehensive rehabilitation services including physical, occupational and speech therapy. Our therapists are experts in treating conditions affecting adults ages 50+. Therapy is a cost-effective treatment that allows patients to participate in a recovery plan designed for their specific needs to regain function and independence for a better quality of life.

For more information, contact www.htstherapy.com.

 


October is National Physical Therapy Month!
National Physical Therapy Month is designed to recognize the impact that physical therapists and physical therapist assistants make in restoring and improving motion in people’s lives. Physical therapy may be necessary for those recovering after an illness, a fall, injury, surgery or chronic condition. Physical therapists work hard to help patients retain and regain their quality of life.

 


Speak with your doctor to find out how therapy could benefit you!

 

Resource: APTA, www.apta.org