Chronic pain is one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care.  In fact, statistics show that 60-75% of adults age 60+ report at least one type of chronic pain. Living with chronic pain can be overwhelming and greatly impact your quality of life. Pain can be debilitating making it very difficult to get around and complete daily activities.  Also, many adults suffering from pain may experience depression, anxiety, trouble sleeping, weight loss and cognitive impairment.      

Pain is not a normal part of aging.  If you or someone you know suffers from chronic pain, talk with your doctor to discuss ways to manage your pain without prescription opioids.  Pain relief can include many strategies including physical and occupational therapy, exercise, acupuncture, massage, spinal manipulation, interventional therapies (injections), cognitive behavioral therapy, and meditation among many others.  These methods can often be more effective than drugs and have fewer risks and side effects.

 

How Can Therapy Help?

Physical therapists can assess your pain and establish a therapy treatment plan fit for you. Treatment goals may include: pain relief, extended range of motion, increased strength and improved functional mobility. Non-invasive technology such as electrical stimulation (e-stim), ultrasound therapy, and hot and cold therapy can help to reduce pain and inflammation.

Occupational therapists work to evaluate how pain may be impacting your desired activities and quality of life. They can teach skills and strategies to help manage your pain.

 

Pain Quiz

    1. Does pain affect your ability to handle daily responsibilities or activities?
    2. Does your pain make it difficult for you to bathe or get dressed?
    3. Does your pain make it difficult to climb or descend stairs?
    4. Does your pain make it difficult to get out of bed or a chair?
    5. Are you taking opioid medications daily?

If you answered yes, talk with your doctor about physical and occupational therapy treatment options.


IASP® – Facts on Pain in Older Persons,  www.iasp-pain.org

CDC – https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/patients/index.html

Morning stretching is important for your body to help kick-start your energy levels and improve circulation. Stretching can help loosen tight muscles and improve your range of motion making it easier to move and perform daily activities like getting dressed and picking up objects from the floor.

Try these simple stretches you can do every morning in bed. If you have any concerns about stretching please consult with your health care provider. We recommend stretching at least 2 to 3 times per week.

Full-body Stretch: Inhale, reach your arms overhead & straighten your legs out. Hold for 5 counts, then exhale & release the stretch. Repeat 3 times.

Knees-to-Chest: Lay on your back, bend your knees and use your hands to draw one knee in toward your chest at a time, wrapping your arms around both shins. Hold for 10 deep breaths.

Seated Forward Bend: Begin by sitting up and keeping your legs straight. Inhale and lengthen through your spine; as you exhale, start to walk your fingertips toward your feet. When you get to your farthest point, let your neck hang heavy toward your legs, releasing any tension. Hold for 10 rounds of breathing.


If you are experiencing pain or having trouble moving around and performing daily activities, talk with your doctor about Physical and Occupational Therapy. Physical therapists can teach you how to exercise and stretch appropriately for joint mobility, muscle strength and fitness. Occupational therapists can help older adults to safely do the things they want to do, stay active and live well despite limitations.

 

Last week, HTS held a Nurse Appreciation contest to celebrate National Nurse’s Week! Thank you to everyone for sending in nominations. We are honored to work alongside so many wonderful nurses in our communities. Thank you for your sharing your incredible hearts and devoting tireless service to our industry.

Our Nurse’s Week Winners Are…

Each winner will receive a $50 gift card and swag bag from your friends at HTS.

Ashley Plue, LPN at Milner Community Health Care
Alison Snow, Director of Nursing at Nazareth Home Clifton
Cassandra Brown, RN BSN Director of Nursing at Metcalfe Health Care Center
Barb Sword, RN, HFA, CDP Director of Clinical Services at Hickory Creek
Christy Canter, RN at Hickory Creek at New Castle
Laurie Briggs, LPN at Grayson Manor
Katrina Wilson, Director of Nursing at Guerin Woods
Kelly McDougal, Health Services Director at Crestwood Village South
Michelle “Missy” Ryan LPN, MDS Coordinator at Northview Health & Living

A Special Shout Out to All the Amazing Nurses Nominated!

As a special thank you to all the nurses nominated, HTS will be sending each nurse a small gift from us to express our sincere appreciation and gratitude.

Alicia Tankersley at Swiss Village
Alma Ahmetovic at Swiss Village
Barb Simpson at Good Samaritan Home
Cynthia Palm at Maple Manor
Dana Roach at LLV Pine Valley
Debbie Rohrig at Ripley Crossing
Delisa McCloud at Glenburn Home
Heath Haver at Golden Years
Jaymee Brockhaus at LLV Pine Valley
Jayne Melton at Ketcham Memorial
Jessuca Willis at Hickory Creek at Hicksville
Kate Molin at Golden Years
Kelly Badjek at Hamilton Grove
Kim Davis at Heritage Pointe of Huntington
Kim Ray at Spring Creek
Kim Smith at Golden Years
Kristy Uhrick at Swiss Village
Mandy Bonbrake at Heritage Pointe of Huntington
Megan Rittenhouse at Heritage Pointe of Huntington
Monica Broady at Maple Manor
Nada Wireman at Parkview Haven
Natalie Bergman at Compass Park
Nicole Kubley at Grace Village
Pam Grabbe at Golden Years
Patty Engle at Ripley Crossing
Rona Westrich at Hamilton Grove
Sandy Stearns at Metcalfe Health Care Center
Sharon Smitty at Guerin Woods
Shona Kirkpatrick at Golden Years
Steve Brian at Guerin Woods
Teresa Headington at Guerin Woods
Teresa Medler at Good Samaritan Home
Theresa Wright at Golden Years
Tressa McNeely at HIckory Creek at Scottsburg
Viola Sheckles at Hickory Creek at Franklin

Blog by Cassie Murray, OTR, MBA, QCP, Chief Operating & Clinical Officer

During the May 12th CMS Office Hours broadcast, CMS provided guidance for SNF therapists to include the time spent donning and doffing PPE in the MDS Section O minutes. Therapists should begin including this time in the total treatment time for each session. This topic is covered in the recorded podcast between time markers 3:02 and 3:54. The link below is to the recording and written transcript.

Tuesday, May 12, 2020, CMS Office Hours (ZIP)

For questions or additional information, contact your Regional Director or Cassie Murray.

HTS Celebrates National Skilled Nursing Week

In recognition of National Skilled Nursing Week, Healthcare Therapy Services, Inc. celebrated with their partners by honoring our aging in addition to the health care heroes for their unwavering commitment to improving the lives of those served. National Skilled Nursing Care Week was established by the American Health Care Association (AHCA) in 1967. National Skilled Nursing Week ran from May 10-16, 2020. Inspired by this years’ theme “Sharing Our Wisdom”, HTS created an art activity for residents and staff to participate. “It’s more important than ever to celebrate our skilled nursing communities. This year’s celebration looks a little different than in year’s past since we have social distancing and other restrictions in place. We wanted to do something that everyone could participate in. Reading the heartfelt words of wisdom from our residents has been one of the most rewarding parts of all of this. We are just thrilled with the participation that we received!” -Holly Skidmore, Director of Marketing

Congratulations to our winners!

Congratulations to the following winners of the National Skilled Nursing Week “Sharing Our Wisdom” contest. We had great participation from our homes and many residents shared their wonderful words of wisdom. Thank you to all who participated!

1st Place Winner: Heritage Pointe of Huntington, Huntington, IN
2nd Place Winner: The Cedars of Lebanon, Lebanon, KY
3rd Place Winner: Golden Years Homestead, Fort Wayne, IN

Click here to view the video showcasing photos for the contest.

Some inspiring words of wisdom from the residents of our partner communities:

Barb F: “Be Happy. Smile more and worry less.”

Mary M: “Do your very best in everything you do.”

Clara F: “Enjoy the little things in life. Don’t take anything for granted.”

Jonetta W: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

Georgette P: “Love your family, everybody, and the Lord. Haste makes waste. Love your neighbor as yourself. I love everyone.”

Cathy S: “Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

Cleola: “Take care of people and God will take care of you!”

Herb: “Never stop learning.”

Lewis: “Accept Christ as your Savior and you will live life in security. Watch your money. Never go for revenge.”

Ron: “Enjoy your life when you are young!”

Helen: “Be nice to people.”

Deloris: “Make life fun, never stop playing!”

Fay: “Always start your prayer with “Thank you Lord, for all you’ve done for me” before you ask for anything.”

 

#NSNCW

Blog by:  Shelly Maffia, MSN, MBA, RN, LNHA, QCP, CHC, Director of Regulatory Services, Proactive Medical Review

As part of President Trump’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced new nursing home reopening recommendations for state and local officials. These recommendations detail criteria for relaxing certain restrictions and mitigating the risk of resurgence, visitation and service considerations, and restoration of survey activities.

The guidance encourages state leaders to collaborate with the state survey agency and state and local health departments to decide how these criteria or actions should be implemented in their state and provides examples of how a State may choose to implement the recommendations, which includes options of states to require that all facilities go through each phase at the same time, allowing facilities in a certain region within the state to enter each phase at the same time, or permitting individual facilities to move through each phase based on their status for meeting the criteria for each phase.

Click here to continue reading this blog.

 

About Proactive Medical Review
HTS partners with Proactive Medical Review, a third party company who specializes in ensuring compliance with regulatory standards and promoting measurable care excellence. The team includes SNF experienced nurse, MDS, Health Facility Administrator, therapist and reimbursement specialists with experience serving in multi-site contract therapy operations, as corporate directors of quality, clinical program specialists, and Compliance Officers. Proactive is uniquely positioned to assist in managing the many changes and challenges facing providers partnered with HTS. Learn more about our commitment to compliance here.

HTS Partners with the Hoosier Brewing Company

Healthcare Therapy Services, Inc. (HTS) has partnered with the Hoosier Brewing Company, a Greenwood, Indiana based craft beer producer and distributor to provide much needed hand sanitizer to skilled nursing facilities statewide. “As the economy is reopening, we have to remain diligent in our efforts to continue to protect our residents and teams. Since hand sanitizer still remains in short supply for some buildings, we wanted to do our part to support our partners across Indiana.” Steve Chatham, HTS President.

Late-March, Hoosier Brewing Company switched their production from brewing craft beer to mix ethanol, glycerol and hydrogen peroxide into 80% alcohol hand sanitizer. They manufactured the sanitizer based on the TTB, the governing agency over the distillery and from guidelines from FDA and World Health Organization (WHO).

Healthcare Therapy Services, Inc. purchased the hand sanitizer and received additional donated gallons from the Hoosier Brewing Company. “They have been a great partner. Hoosier Brewing Company has already donated hundreds of gallons to first responders and senior living communities. It just made sense for us to work together to continue this effort since we serve so many homes throughout the state.” Amanda Green, HTS Executive Director of Strategic Development.

HTS has delivered so far, over 90 gallons of hand sanitizer from both Hoosier Brewing Company and Jim Beam to skilled nursing communities throughout Indiana.


If you need hand sanitizer or want information on requests for donating to your community, contact Hoosier Brewing Company at info@servehoosiers.com or call Dylan Shaffer, Customer Service Manager at 317-215-4753.

To find out more information about HTS, contact Amanda Green at amanda@htstherapy.com | 317-523-7358

 

Did you know that you can still get a workout while sitting down? Exercise helps keep our bodies healthy and strong. Try incorporating these exercises into your daily routine to stay active and in shape at home.

 

Ankle Circles

Sit in a chair with feet flat on the floor. Extend your right knee and move your foot in a circle 20 times. Then move in the other direction 20 times. Repeat with the other ankle.

 

Seated March

Sit in a chair with feet flat on the floor. Lift up your right knee as high as comfortable. Lower your leg. Alternate lifting your knees for a total of 10 lifts each leg.

 

Arm Circles

Stand or seat and raise your arms to shoulder height. Begin arm circles in 360 degree circles to the rear and back to your beginning position. Repeat 10 times, go in opposite direction

 

Shoulder Rolls

Stand or sit with or without weights in hands and arms at side. Feet are shoulder width apart. Raise shoulders upward toward ears, backward and down. Return to the starting position and repeat 20 times.

 

Tips for your workout:

  • Wear comfortable clothing that will allow you to freely move your arms and legs.
  • Choose a sturdy chair that doesn’t slide or roll.
  • Don’t overdo it, take your time and allow yourself several breaks.
  • Gently stretch before and after your workout.

 

Therapy Can Help Aging Adults Stay Active & Independent

Exercise is extremely important in managing many common symptoms of aging. Physical therapists evaluate your needs and teach you how to exercise appropriately for joint mobility, muscle strength and fitness. Occupational therapists help older adults to safely do the things they want to do, stay active and live well despite limitations. Therapy can help with pain associated with sitting too much, address postural issues, and create strategies to get you moving more and sitting less.

Blog by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

SEQUENCE FOR PUTTING ON PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)

The type of PPE used will vary based on the level of precautions required, such as standard and contact, droplet or airborne infection isolation precautions. The procedure for putting on and removing PPE should be tailored to the specific type of PPE.

  1. GOWN

    • Fully cover torso from neck to knees, arms to end of wrists, and wrap around the back Fasten in back of neck and waist
  2. MASK OR RESPIRATOR

    • Secure ties or elastic bands at middle of head and neck Fit flexible band to nose bridge Fit snug to face and below chin Fit-check respirator
  3. GOGGLES OR FACE SHIELD

    • Place over face and eyes and adjust to fit
  4. GLOVES

    • Extend to cover wrist of isolation gown

USE SAFE WORK PRACTICES TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND LIMIT THE SPREAD OF CONTAMINATION

  • Keep hands away from face
  • Limit surfaces touched
  • Change gloves when torn or heavily contaminated
  • Perform hand hygiene

 

HOW TO SAFELY REMOVE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) EXAMPLE 1

There are a variety of ways to safely remove PPE without contaminating your clothing, skin, or mucous membranes with potentially infectious materials. Here is one example. Remove all PPE before exiting the patient room except a respirator, if worn. Remove the respirator after leaving the patient room and closing the door. Remove PPE in the following sequence:

  1. GLOVES

    • Outside of gloves are contaminated!
    • If your hands get contaminated during glove removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Using a gloved hand, grasp the palm area of the other gloved hand and peel off first glove
    • Hold removed glove in gloved hand
    • Slide fingers of ungloved hand under remaining glove at wrist and peel off second glove over first glove
    • Discard gloves in a waste container
  2. GOGGLES OR FACE SHIELD

    • Outside of goggles or face shield are contaminated!
    • If your hands get contaminated during goggle or face shield removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Remove goggles or face shield from the back by lifting head band or ear pieces
    • If the item is reusable, place in designated receptacle for reprocessing. Otherwise, discard in a waste container
  3. GOWN

    • Gown front and sleeves are contaminated!
    • If your hands get contaminated during gown removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Unfasten gown ties, taking care that sleeves don’t contact your body when reaching for ties
    • Pull gown away from neck and shoulders, touching inside of gown only
    • Turn gown inside out
    • Fold or roll into a bundle and discard in a waste container
  4. MASK OR RESPIRATOR

    • Front of mask/respirator is contaminated — DO NOT TOUCH!
    • If your hands get contaminated during mask/respirator removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Grasp bottom ties or elastics of the mask/respirator, then the ones at the top, and remove without touching the front
    • Discard in a waste container
  5. WASH HANDS OR USE AN ALCOHOL-BASED HAND SANITIZER IMMEDIATELY AFTER REMOVING ALL PPE

PERFORM HAND HYGIENE BETWEEN STEPS IF HANDS BECOME CONTAMINATED AND IMMEDIATELY AFTER REMOVING ALL PPE

 

HOW TO SAFELY REMOVE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) EXAMPLE 2

Here is another way to safely remove PPE without contaminating your clothing, skin, or mucous membranes with potentially infectious materials. Remove all PPE before exiting the patient room except a respirator, if worn. Remove the respirator after leaving the patient room and closing the door. Remove PPE in the following sequence:

  1. GOWN AND GLOVES
    • Gown front and sleeves and the outside of gloves are contaminated!
    • If your hands get contaminated during gown or glove removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Grasp the gown in the front and pull away from your body so that the ties break, touching outside of gown only with gloved hands
    • While removing the gown, fold or roll the gown inside-out into a bundle
    • As you are removing the gown, peel off your gloves at the same time, only touching the inside of the gloves and gown with your bare hands. Place the gown and gloves into a waste container
  2. GOGGLES OR FACE SHIELD
    • Outside of goggles or face shield are contaminated!
    • If your hands get contaminated during goggle or face shield removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Remove goggles or face shield from the back by lifting head band and without touching the front of the goggles or face shield
    • If the item is reusable, place in designated receptacle for reprocessing. Otherwise, discard in a waste container
  3. MASK OR RESPIRATOR
    • Front of mask/respirator is contaminated — DO NOT TOUCH!
    • If your hands get contaminated during mask/respirator removal, immediately wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Grasp bottom ties or elastics of the mask/respirator, then the ones at the top, and remove without touching the front
    • Discard in a waste container
  4. WASH HANDS OR USE AN ALCOHOL-BASED HAND SANITIZER IMMEDIATELY AFTER REMOVING ALL PPE

PERFORM HAND HYGIENE BETWEEN STEPS IF HANDS BECOME CONTAMINATED AND IMMEDIATELY AFTER REMOVING ALL PPE

 

Click here to view the pdf.

HTS is excited to launch Breathe: A Pulmonary Intervention Program supported and directed by physical and occupational therapists. Breathe is focused on Percussion and Postural Drainage Therapy also known as chest physical therapy. Therapy interventions can be beneficial in the respiratory treatment and physical rehabilitation of patients with COVID-19, COPD, Pneumonia, Bronchitis, Asthma, ARDS, Lung Cancer and many other respiratory conditions.

Postural Drainage Can Help Patients Breathe Better!

Postural drainage can help treat breathing problems due to inflammation and mucus in the airways of the lungs. Postural Drainage Therapy uses percussion, gravity, vibration, and deep breathing to loosen and drain mucus from the lungs and stimulate a productive cough to clear airways. Unclogging the airways is vital to keeping lungs healthy.

  • Promote Drainage of Mucus and Secretions
  • Stimulate a Productive Cough
  • Optimize the Efficacy of Adjunctive Treatments, such as Inhaled Bronchodilators or Antibiotics
  • Improve Oxygen in the Body
  • Decrease the Risk of Chest Infection, such as Pneumonia

 

HTS Therapists are equipped with the knowledge and training to provide this critical treatment intervention to help patients breathe better!

For more information about the HTS Breathe Pulmonary Program, please contact your HTS Regional Director.