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Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. There is not any one specific cause of diabetes however there are many factors which contribute to a higher risk of getting the disease including but not limited to genetics, obesity, physical inactivity, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Type 1 Diabetes – Caused by genetics and unknown factors
There is no cure, however it can be managed to prevent further diabetes-related complications.

Type 2 Diabetes – Caused by genetics and lifestyle factors
Can be prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyle changes.

Prediabetes affects more than 84 million adults in America
Losing weight and staying active can greatly reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Healthy Lifestyle Choices

Diet – A healthy diet is one that is rich in nutrients and low in calories. Eat foods high in fiber such as fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains and nuts.
Hydration – Be sure to drink plenty of water and avoid sugary drinks and caffeine.
Exercise – It’s very important to exercise for 45 minutes or more at least 3-4 times per week. Walking, riding a bicycle, running, and swimming are a few examples.

Therapy’s Role in Managing Diabetes

Occupational Therapy can help improve the individual’s physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and sensory aspects; which are important in all aspects of everyday living activities.
Physical Therapy can assess to determine a set exercise routine that would be safe and beneficial. Also, diabetic neuropathy can be treated with massage, balance and gait training, and conditioning.
Speech Therapy can assist with difficulty swallowing or talking, due to complications of diabetes.

 


Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More people in America suffer from pain than diabetes, cancer and heart disease combined. When pain lasts for a long time (3 to 6 months or more), it is called chronic pain. The CDC recently released a report estimating that 50 million Americans, more than 20 percent of the adult population, have chronic pain.

Managing & Treating Your Pain

Chronic pain can have real effects on your day-to-day life and your overall health. Treating chronic pain can be difficult because it varies from person to person as well as many different causes and possible treatments. Developing the right treatment plan for your diagnosis is often the work of a multidisciplinary team of medical professionals. When consulting with your doctor, he may refer you to visit a physical and occupational therapist.

Physical Therapy (PT)
Physical therapy practitioners can assess your chronic pain, and based on your goals, will establish a therapy treatment plan fit for you. Treatment may include both passive and active treatments. Passive treatments help you to relax, while active treatments are therapeutic exercises that strengthen your body and help you deal with your pain.

Occupational Therapy (OT)
Occupational therapy practitioners understand that pain it subjective and complex. OT’s work individually with you to evaluate the pain’s impact on your desired activities and quality of life. They teach you skills and strategies to manage and cope with your pain.

Pain Reducing Technology
Therapists may use non-invasive technology such as Electrical Stimulation (e-stim) which blocks the pain signal to the affected area while reducing inflammation. Also, Ultrasound and a combination of heat and cooling therapies may be used to reduce pain.

If you or a loved one suffer with chronic pain, it is important to pay attention to your body. Be proactive to keep your pain under control. Consult with your doctor and ask if physical and occupational therapy can help you!

References: American Occupational Therapy Association

The use of a cane or walker has become the norm for most seniors today to help prevent falls. Ironically, these tools can be just as dangerous as they are helpful if they are not used properly. The CDC estimates nearly 50,000 seniors end up in the emergency room each year after falling while using a cane or walker. Health professionals are urging adults who use canes and walkers as walking aids to be properly assessed and fitted by a therapist to avoid fall-related injuries. Physical Therapists are trained professionals that are able to assess your individual needs to ensure that you are using the proper walking aid as well as make sure it is in proper working condition.

Tips for Using Canes & Walkers

  1. The walker or cane should be about the height of your wrists when your arms are at your sides.
  2. In order to be properly supported by a cane, you should be using it on the side of your body opposite from your injury or weakness.
  3. When using a walker, your arms should be slightly bent when holding on, but you shouldn’t have to bend forward at the waist to reach it.
  4. Periodically check the rubber tips at the bottom of the cane or walker. Be sure to replace them if they are uneven or worn.
  5. Wear flat shoes to provide a good base of support.

 

Therapy Can Help Reduce Falls & Improve Balance

Maintaining proper balance and sense of body position is critical to preventing falls. A Physical Therapist works with individuals to identify risk factors and designs an individualized program of exercises and activities with an emphasis on strength, flexibility, and proper gait. Occupational Therapists work with you to discuss changes and modifications that can be made around your home to help prevent falls from occurring. If you have concerns about your balance, ask your doctor if you could benefit from therapy.

HTS is excited to collaborate with our partners for a successful transition to the new Medicare payment model. Our ongoing focus on clinical quality, patient-centered programs, and functional outcomes has prepared our staff in advance to succeed under PDPM. In addition to implementing proprietary clinical program efficacy analysis, HTS has assessed the financial impact of PDPM and is committed to supporting our partners through the challenges of adapting to the new reimbursement model.

HTS will be providing PDPM solutions that include:

  • Staff Education and Training in Critical Areas such as Section GG and ICD.10 Coding
  • PDPM Live Trainings for Partners and Staff in Multiple Locations
  • Internal System Transitions
  • RUGs IV to PDPM Facility-specific Impact Analysis

Our alliance with Proactive Medical Review, the PDPM experts currently providing education on this topic to 25 states, allows us to uniquely provide our partners with additional support for strategic planning, MDS coding efficacy, and nursing best practices.

Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM) training dates:

  • Friday, September 21 – Evansville, IN
  • Thursday, October 4 – Fort Wayne, IN
  • Thursday, October 11 – Louisville, KY
  • Tuesday, October 16 – Greenwood, IN
  • Tuesday, October 23 – Kokomo, IN
  • Friday, November 9 – Edmonton, KY
  • Thursday November 15—Phelps, KY

We remain optimistic considering the enormous changes we are facing with this new payment model. As partners in therapy, you can be confident in our resources and unmatched expertise to navigate this change while working together toward a successful transition.

If you have any questions at all about this information, please contact us directly.

National Physical Therapy Month is a celebration held each October by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). PT month is designed to recognize the impact that physical therapists and physical therapist assistants make in restoring and improving motion in people’s lives. Physical therapists are movement experts who can help you overcome pain, gain and maintain movement, and preserve your independence, often without the need for surgery or long-term use of prescription drugs. Physical therapy is a cost-effective treatment that allows patients to participate in a recovery plan designed for their specific needs.

Goals of physical therapy include:

  • Restore physical function
  • Improve the ability to ambulate
  • Strengthen the body affected by injury/illness
  • Reduce pain and inflammation
  • Education and prevention

We offer comprehensive rehabilitation services including physical, occupational and speech therapy. Our therapists are experts in treating conditions affecting adults ages 50+. Therapy is a cost-effective treatment that allows patients to participate in a recovery plan designed for their specific needs to regain function and independence for a better quality of life.

For more information, contact www.htstherapy.com.

 


October is National Physical Therapy Month!
National Physical Therapy Month is designed to recognize the impact that physical therapists and physical therapist assistants make in restoring and improving motion in people’s lives. Physical therapy may be necessary for those recovering after an illness, a fall, injury, surgery or chronic condition. Physical therapists work hard to help patients retain and regain their quality of life.

 


Speak with your doctor to find out how therapy could benefit you!

 

Resource: APTA, www.apta.org

Occupational Therapists work every day to help others live their life to the fullest.

When a person is affected by illness, accident, disability, or a mental health condition, occupational therapists help individuals stay active and live well despite limitations. With the help of Occupational Therapists, people can live more independent and productive lives.

Benefits of Occupational Therapy
Nearly one-third of occupational therapists work with older adults. They perform many types of activities, using many types of therapies, with the overriding goal of helping older adults regain or maintain a level of independence that will allow them to live a healthy and productive life.

Daily Life Activities and Modifications
Occupational therapists help people with daily life activities such as bathing, dressing, feeding, homemaking, and more. By developing individualized strategies, chronic pain and arthritis no longer keep patients from participating in activities. Occupational therapists also provide patients with the tools they need to optimize their home environment in order to promote full participation in life activities.

Life Transitions
As we age, we go through numerous transition phases in life, such as retirement, relocation, widowhood, etc. Occupational therapists provide opportunities for patients to recognize the commonalities in their experiences and to gain problem-solving abilities to handle these transitions.

Fall Prevention
People often fall because of bone fragility, slower reflexes, loss of footing, and many other factors. These falls are dangerous as they may result in severe injuries and broken bones. Therapists help inform and instruct patients on staying active, conserving energy, and on techniques and methods of preventing falls.


Celebrate Occupational Therapy Month — April 2018

Occupational therapists dedicate their lives to helping others achieve their best life by helping them overcome life changes after an injury or illness or due to aging. If you think you or a loved one could benefit from the help of an occupational therapist talk to your doctor today!

 

 

Sources: AOTA, www.aota.org

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or COPD is an umbrella term used to describle progressive lung diseases such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and non-reversible asthma. People with COPD suffer with continued and increasing breathlessness. The symptoms of COPD are sometimes difficult to notice because they can be mistaken for the common cold or normal aging. COPD affects an estimated 30 million people in the United States and over half of them are unaware of their condition. Taking note of your symptoms and asking your doctor to screen you can help you avoid losing major function in your lungs.

Symptoms of COPD:

  • Increased Breathlessness
  • Frequent Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Chest Tightness
  • Increased Mucus
  • Dizziness Upon Waking
  • Swollen Ankles
  • Frequent Respiratory Infections
  • Difficulty Sleeping
  • Fatigue or Inability to Exercise

COPD leads to the decline of pulmonary function and can lower your quality of life. Genetics and exposure to work/environmental pollutants can cause COPD, but the primary cause is smoking. Smoking and second-hand smoke account for 90% of COPD cases. Quitting smoking is extremely important to slow the progression of COPD. Slowing the progression of the disease can also be done through changing the air quality in your home and work environment.

Exercise and rehabilitation are great weapons in the war on COPD. Too often, patients with COPD avoid exercise because of their shortness of breath. Without exercise and improving endurance, the shortness of breath will only worsen. Physical therapists can help COPD patients exercise in a safe and secure environment. Physical and occupational therapy can improve your ability to exercise, your strength and endurance, and help you conserve energy doing daily tasks. Therapists can also help reduce difficulty in breathing by providing helpful breathing exercises. Talk to your doctor today about the benefits of both physical and occupational therapy to slow the progression of COPD!

 

Sources: COPD Foundation